April182012
March62012
Egyptian Lawmaker Forced to Resign Over Nose Job || NYT
The first political scandal of Egypt’s fledgling electoral democracy erupted Monday after an Islamist lawmaker was expelled from his ultraconservative party, accused of fabricating a story that he was viciously beaten by masked gunmen.
Doctors said that the bandages on his face in fact covered up plastic surgery on his nose.
The lawmaker, Anwar el-Balkimy, had belonged to Al Nour, part of the ultraconservative Salafi movement — Egypt’s religious right — whose members typically condemn plastic surgery as sinful, along with most music and other popular entertainment.
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Egyptian Lawmaker Forced to Resign Over Nose Job || NYT

The first political scandal of Egypt’s fledgling electoral democracy erupted Monday after an Islamist lawmaker was expelled from his ultraconservative party, accused of fabricating a story that he was viciously beaten by masked gunmen.

Doctors said that the bandages on his face in fact covered up plastic surgery on his nose.

The lawmaker, Anwar el-Balkimy, had belonged to Al Nour, part of the ultraconservative Salafi movement — Egypt’s religious right — whose members typically condemn plastic surgery as sinful, along with most music and other popular entertainment.

Read More

February82012
December192011
Funeral prayers for Sheikh ‘Imad ‘Effat, a senior Al-Azhar scholar, who was killed during a protest in Egypt last Friday.
December182011

‘Blue bra girl’ atrocity: Egyptian military police more than brutal (VIDEO)|| RT

Egypt 

December162011
“May Allah forgive our teacher, Sh. ‘Imad ‘Iffat who was murdered today in a protest in Egypt. Please make dua for him and his family. Many of us benefited from him in ways that only Allah knows and can reward.” Imam Suhaib Webb
December32011
December12011

Indecision 2011 - Let My People Vote - Egyptian Parliamentary Election


Aasif Mandvi heads to Cairo to evaluate Egyptian Muslims’ ability to uphold freedom and democracy. (04:35)
Great segment with Aasif Mandvi, starts about a minute in.
November222011
August222011
ihya:

The veil is a powerful symbol of the clash between Islam and capitalism. This clash first emerged during the early period of European colonialism when Europe started to ideologically challenge the Islamic world, which was in a period of decline and weakness in contrast to the newly industrialised European powers. Western imperialism is therefore intrinsic to the attack on the veil, a theme which is explored by Leila Ahmed, a professor at the Divinty School, Harvard University, in her book, “A Quiet Revolution: The Veil’s Resurgence, from the Middle East to America”.

Exploring changing attitudes to women’s dress in Egypt, the cradle of both the unveiling movement and the veil’s return, throughout the 20th century, she tackles some of the questions so mauled by journalists and politicians. Why did the veil re-emerge among university-educated and professional women? Is it really a symbol of female oppression? Does it signify rejection of the west? Why can it inspire such fear and revulsion?

Leila Ahmed writes:

The burka as shorthand moral justification for war… Of course, invoking the theme of the oppression of women in Islam as justification for war and domination is nothing new to the history of western imperialism. In fact this rhetoric of “saving the women” in the name of “civilization” is an old ploy used many times in the past in particular by British and French imperialists.

We have yet to really see a deep, and honest debate about how a society should be structured and organised. Rather we see a distorted picture of women in Islam depicted in the media and dishonest attacks upon Islam and Muslim women, which don’t hold up to intellectual scrutiny. This book provides some insight as to why this is the case. 
ihya

I’m reading this right now, mostly because I was intrigued as to why Leila Ahmed changed her perspective on the hijab. I’m only a few chapters in right now but so far it’s quite a comprehensive analysis on the politics and purpose of the hijab.

ihya:

The veil is a powerful symbol of the clash between Islam and capitalism. This clash first emerged during the early period of European colonialism when Europe started to ideologically challenge the Islamic world, which was in a period of decline and weakness in contrast to the newly industrialised European powers. Western imperialism is therefore intrinsic to the attack on the veil, a theme which is explored by Leila Ahmed, a professor at the Divinty School, Harvard University, in her book, “A Quiet Revolution: The Veil’s Resurgence, from the Middle East to America”.

Exploring changing attitudes to women’s dress in Egypt, the cradle of both the unveiling movement and the veil’s return, throughout the 20th century, she tackles some of the questions so mauled by journalists and politicians. Why did the veil re-emerge among university-educated and professional women? Is it really a symbol of female oppression? Does it signify rejection of the west? Why can it inspire such fear and revulsion?

Leila Ahmed writes:

The burka as shorthand moral justification for war… Of course, invoking the theme of the oppression of women in Islam as justification for war and domination is nothing new to the history of western imperialism. In fact this rhetoric of “saving the women” in the name of “civilization” is an old ploy used many times in the past in particular by British and French imperialists.

We have yet to really see a deep, and honest debate about how a society should be structured and organised. Rather we see a distorted picture of women in Islam depicted in the media and dishonest attacks upon Islam and Muslim women, which don’t hold up to intellectual scrutiny. This book provides some insight as to why this is the case. 

ihya

I’m reading this right now, mostly because I was intrigued as to why Leila Ahmed changed her perspective on the hijab. I’m only a few chapters in right now but so far it’s quite a comprehensive analysis on the politics and purpose of the hijab.

May132011
Street Art and the Egyptian Revolution - Atlantic
On the sidewalk outside Cairo’s Faculty of Fine Arts college on leafy  Zamalek Island, just across the Nile from Tahrir Square, hijab-wearing  young women are elbow-deep in paint. Absorbed in their work, they climb  ladders to study the effect, all the while graciously answering  questions from a gathering audience. The students, whose sweet faces are  framed by pastel scarves, don’t look much like revolutionaries, even if  their art tells stories of blood, agony and rage.
Two months after protests forced Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak  from office, these students are communicating their feelings about the  revolution in the way they know best: by covering the school’s drab gray  walls with colorful political art.
One of the mural’s artists, Youmna Mustafa, 20, points to the bound  screaming face on her wall and says her piece is about freedom of  speech.
"This is what the square meant to me," the student of mosaic art says.  "This is why I went. Not to be able to speak your mind, your wants and  desires, share your thoughts out loud, is to feel," she pauses,  searching for the word, "dead."

Street Art and the Egyptian Revolution - Atlantic

On the sidewalk outside Cairo’s Faculty of Fine Arts college on leafy Zamalek Island, just across the Nile from Tahrir Square, hijab-wearing young women are elbow-deep in paint. Absorbed in their work, they climb ladders to study the effect, all the while graciously answering questions from a gathering audience. The students, whose sweet faces are framed by pastel scarves, don’t look much like revolutionaries, even if their art tells stories of blood, agony and rage.

Two months after protests forced Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak from office, these students are communicating their feelings about the revolution in the way they know best: by covering the school’s drab gray walls with colorful political art.

One of the mural’s artists, Youmna Mustafa, 20, points to the bound screaming face on her wall and says her piece is about freedom of speech.

"This is what the square meant to me," the student of mosaic art says. "This is why I went. Not to be able to speak your mind, your wants and desires, share your thoughts out loud, is to feel," she pauses, searching for the word, "dead."

Egypt art 

May82011
May52011
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