April182014

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via allbravura)

4PM

ugh i am so stupid

April142014

(Source: literaryheroine, via lanaatdelrey)

11PM

Reading Dickens

austerefrivolity:

I’ve just started my very first Charles Dickens novel, I decided to start with my father’s favorite Great Expectations. I’m only 20% through (yes I got it free for my kindle lol) and I think the greatest lesson so far I’ve taken away from the novel is to not let the bad/catastrophic events of your life determine the course of your life. Learn to let things go. A hyperbolic example of what happens when you don’t is Miss Havashim. She is literally trapped in the moment before she was left at the alter, her cake a metaphor for her life crumbling, decaying rot. 

I can’t wait to continue :).

6PM
“Not everyone will be happy at your success nor will everyone be saddened by your loss so be careful whom you share your personal matters with.” Mufti Ismail Menk

(via fakjumather)

(Source: islamic-art-and-quotes, via lanaatdelrey)

April92014

Khalid Latif - Self-Control and Forgiveness

4PM
“A man asked ash-Shafi’i, “O Abu ‘Abdillah! Which is better for a person, to gain power or to be afflicted?” So ash-Shafi’i said, “One will not gain power until he is afflicted. For indeed Allah afflicted Nuh, Ibrahim, Musa, ‘Isa and Muhammad, may the salawat of Allah and salam be upon them all. So when they were patient, they gained power, so let not anyone think at all that he is free from pain.””  [Madarij as-Salikin by Ibn al-Qayyim 2/283] (via africanamerican-muslim)

(Source: islamicrays, via thebeautyofislam)

April12014

beautifulsouthasianbrides:

Photos by:Paul&Will

http://www.paulandwill.net/

"Sexy Water+Earth Engagement Session"

I would totally take engagement pics like this.

Too bad I’m Muslim

sad face

(via lajefadelasjefas)

March252014
mughalshit:


Zebunnisa, Daughter of Emperor Alamgir
India, Mughal, 17th or 18th century
Opaque watercolors and gilt on paper

According to The Diwan of Zebunissa: The First Fifty Ghazals translated by Magan Lal and Jessie Duncan Westbrook, Zebunissa was the eldest child of Aurangzeb and his wife Dilras Banu Begum. By age seven she was a Hafiz, a Muslim capable of reciting the entire Qur’an by heart - an occasion that Aurangzeb celebrated by throwing a grand feast, donating 30,000 mohurs (likely these) to the poor, and giving two days holiday to the public offices.
She also spoke Arabic, was proficient in mathematics and science, and began a commentary on the Qur’an though her father (known to history for being overzealous) forbade her from writing it. He did however indulge her in poetry, gathering renowned poets throughout the empire to tutor the princess, though he banned reading poetry in the harem and madrasas.
Surprisingly, she was granted a great deal of freedom in the court. She participated in some courtly affairs, always veiled.
Perhaps she took the name Makhfi, "the Hidden One", in tribute to this practice. Once, one of the the poets who came to converse with her asked, "O envy of the moon, lift up thy veil and let me enjoy the wonder of thy beauty," to which the Princess replied,
"    I will not lift my veil,—     For, if I did, who knows? The bulbul might forget the rose,     The Brahman worshipper     Adoring Lakshmi’s grace     Might turn, forsaking her,         To see my face;     My beauty might prevail.     Think how within the flower     Hidden as in a bower     Her fragrant soul must be,     And none can look on it;     So me the world can see Only within the verses I have writ—     I will not lift the veil.   “
After being found in a compromising situation with the son of one of her father’s viziers, and perhaps in addition to a possible hand she may have lent to her brother’s rebellion, she was banished to Salimgarh at Delhi for 20 years, and died there in 1702, at approximately 64.
If you’re interested from reading from the aforementioned title, you can find one here, and another here. If you’d like to see a copy of her poems in Persian from the Lahore Amrit Press, click here.

mughalshit:

Zebunnisa, Daughter of Emperor Alamgir

India, Mughal, 17th or 18th century

Opaque watercolors and gilt on paper

According to The Diwan of Zebunissa: The First Fifty Ghazals translated by Magan Lal and Jessie Duncan Westbrook, Zebunissa was the eldest child of Aurangzeb and his wife Dilras Banu Begum. By age seven she was a Hafiz, a Muslim capable of reciting the entire Qur’an by heart - an occasion that Aurangzeb celebrated by throwing a grand feast, donating 30,000 mohurs (likely these) to the poor, and giving two days holiday to the public offices.

She also spoke Arabic, was proficient in mathematics and science, and began a commentary on the Qur’an though her father (known to history for being overzealous) forbade her from writing it. He did however indulge her in poetry, gathering renowned poets throughout the empire to tutor the princess, though he banned reading poetry in the harem and madrasas.

Surprisingly, she was granted a great deal of freedom in the court. She participated in some courtly affairs, always veiled.

Perhaps she took the name Makhfi, "the Hidden One", in tribute to this practice. Once, one of the the poets who came to converse with her asked, "O envy of the moon, lift up thy veil and let me enjoy the wonder of thy beauty," to which the Princess replied,

"    I will not lift my veil,—
    For, if I did, who knows?
The bulbul might forget the rose,
    The Brahman worshipper
    Adoring Lakshmi’s grace
    Might turn, forsaking her,
        To see my face;
    My beauty might prevail.
    Think how within the flower
    Hidden as in a bower
    Her fragrant soul must be,
    And none can look on it;
    So me the world can see
Only within the verses I have writ—
    I will not lift the veil.   “

After being found in a compromising situation with the son of one of her father’s viziers, and perhaps in addition to a possible hand she may have lent to her brother’s rebellion, she was banished to Salimgarh at Delhi for 20 years, and died there in 1702, at approximately 64.

If you’re interested from reading from the aforementioned title, you can find one here, and another here. If you’d like to see a copy of her poems in Persian from the Lahore Amrit Press, click here.

(Source: bodley30.bodley.ox.ac.uk)

March242014
March232014

OMG RAPUNZEL IS A WOC

March222014
March192014
lanaatdelrey:

ridge:

i have never felt so bad for a confused mother

This is how my mom texts

lanaatdelrey:

ridge:

i have never felt so bad for a confused mother

This is how my mom texts

March182014

huffingtonpost:

Thank you Internet for making this. I can now die happy.

(Source: Imgur)

Enemy faints

6PM

I should’ve just dated and slept around to learn more about myself and been like every other normal woman. Instead, I’m moping over someone who will never look my way. 

One day I’d like to experience non-unrequited feelings. One f’ing day. 

What is the point of being the good girl?

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